August

Contemporary Artists from Turkey in the Imago Mundi - Luciano Benetton Collection

on Wednesday, 10 August 2016. Posted in ---2016---, August

Related Article: Work by Burçak Bingöl enters permanent Collection of the Met in New York


istanbul codex imago mundi
Istanbul Codex, imago mundi collection

227 works by artists from Turkey have recently been included in the ‚Istanbul Codex. Contemporary Artists from Turkey’ part of the Imago Mundi Collection , a cultural, democratic, global, non-profit project, promoted by Luciano Benetton with the aim of creating the widest possible mapping of the different contemporary artistic experiences of our world. In Imago Mundi, each country is represented by the works of established artists and new talents, commissioned with the maximum freedom of expression, whose only constraint is the 10x12 cm format.

The collection is accompanied by a publication of the same title with texts by Luciano Benetton, Claudio Scorretti, Irina Ungureanu, Lora Sarıaslan.

istanbul codex imago mundi
Istanbul Codex, imago mundi collection

Güneş Terkol, Looking for Each Other
Güneş Terkol, Looking for Each Other, 2015, imago mundi collection

Gamze Taşdan, Orhan
Gamze Taşdan, Orhan, 2015, imago mundi collection

Güneş Terkol, Looking for Each Other
Kürşat Bayhan, Waterbottles, 2015, imago mundi collection

Work by Burçak Bingöl enters permanent Collection of the Met in New York

on Wednesday, 10 August 2016. Posted in ---2016---, August

Related Article: CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS FROM TURKEY IN THE IMAGO MUNDI - LUCIANO BENETTON COLLECTION


Burçak Bingöl’s work ‚Broken II’ (2013) is now part of the permanent collection of the Metropolitan Museum New York. The piece is part of a series in which the artist questions Turkish society and heritage, meshes its cultural and personal stories, deconstructs familiar everyday items then casts them in richly-decorated ceramic artwork. Objects such as plain white bottles and tiles are cast and/or decorated in resonance with the traditions of the pre-modern Near East (Seljuq, Ottoman and Safavid). Sometimes they are dashed on the floor – a violent act captured by the artist in a short video installation – and a selection of the shards are then reassembled and decorated. In "Broken II" irregularly broken ceramic pieces have been perpendicularly reassembled in a three-dimensional square panel. Utilizing the medium of floral-decorated stonepaste, this work connects to the traditional ceramics and the colorful, decorative patterns created throughout the centuries in the Islamic world. The prominence given to roses relates especially to the Ottoman period and Iznik ceramics more specifically, wherein this flower appears prominently alongside tulips, hyacinths and carnations, all of which are rendered in a stylized, rather than naturalistic, manner of those in "Broken II." This method of deconstructing a traditional Turkish art form or medium – then reassembling it into a contemporary object calls both to the artistic Ottoman and Islamic heritage and questions the idea of "what is art?" – Bingöl’s counter to Marcel Duchamp’s concept of "ready-made art."

Burçak Bingöl, Broken II
Burçak Bingöl, Broken II, 2013, The Metropolitan Museum New York

The artist’s practice is an interrogation of belonging, culture, identity, decoration and failure by blurring the boundaries between these seemingly distinct notions. They are psychological landscapes that hover between abstraction and representation, seduction and repulsion, adoption and preservation that both embrace and disregard Eastern and Western traditions. They are not only both questioning and expanding the Western canon but also inviting the viewer to a re-consideraton of the distinction between art vs. Craft and high vs. Low. Working with sculptures, drawings, video, photography and installation, her work is a constant investigation of materials and objects where the repetitive act is formulated by merging fiction and failure. Burçak Bingöl’s sixth solo exhibiton Mythos & Utopia will take place at Zilberman Gallery Istanbul between February and April 2017.

Turkey at the 15th International Architecture Biennial

on Monday, 29 August 2016. Posted in ---2016---, August

Related Article: 5th International Çanakkale Biennial Announces Line-Up of Artists


The Pavilion of Turkey at the 15th International Architecture Exhibition, La Biennale di Venezia (28 May-27 November 2016) features the project Darzanà. Curated by Feride Çiçekoğlu, Mehmet Kütükçüoğlu and Ertuğ Uçar, with curatorial collaborators Cemal Emden and Namık Erkal, the exhibition team of Darzanà consists of Hüner Aldemir, Caner Bilgin, Hande Ciğerli, Gökçen Erkılıç, Nazlı Tümerdem and Yiğit Yalgın. The Pavilion of Turkey, coordinated by the Istanbul Foundation for Culture and Arts (İKSV) and co-sponsored by Schüco Turkey and VitrA, is located at the Sale d’Armi, Arsenale.

Darzana, Pavilion of Turkey 15th Architecture Biennial in Venice 2016
Darzanà, Pavilion of Turkey, 15th Architecture Biennial in Venice 2016, Photo: Cemal Emden

Darzanà is a project about frontier infringement and on hybridity. It challenges the increasing confinement within borders of religion, language, race, nationality, ethnicity and gender. The project highlights the common cultural and architectural heritage shared between the arsenals of Istanbul and Venice. For the Biennale Architettura 2016, a last vessel, Baştarda, has been constructed out of abandoned materials found in the old dockyard of Istanbul and transported to Venice to suggest a new connection in Mediterranean.

Darzanà: Two Arsenals, One Vessel

The project title Darzanà means dockyard and it is a hybrid word, like the Turkish word tersane and the Italian word arsenale. These words are derived or distorted from the same root, the Arabic dara’s-sina’a (place of industry). They all originate from the common language that developed in the Mediterranean from the 11th to the 19th century among people such as sailors, travellers, merchants, and warriors. Known as Lingua Franca, this was a shared language when Mediterranean was the main vessel connecting the surrounding cultures. In the same vein, it is possible to talk of a common architectural language and to define it as Architectura Franca.

Despite their very different identities and populations today, Venice and Istanbul once both featured considerable dockyards of similar sizes and production. The common core of these dockyards was the shipsheds called “volti” in Italian and “göz” in Turkish. The shipshed is the building block of a shared architectural heritage; its proportions grow out of the dimensions of boats and of common building technologies. Darzanà links a shipshed of İstanbul with a shipshed of Venice by a vessel. For the project Darzanà, a last vessel, Baştarda was built earlier this year at an abandoned shipshed at the Haliç dockyards in Istanbul.

Similar to Darzanà, Baştarda is also a hybrid word. Derived from bastardo, Baştarda is a cross between a galley and a galleon and is propelled by oars and sails. As a symbol of Mediterranean hybridity, Baştarda creates a bridge between the two shipyards, one left to rot away in the megacity of Istanbul, the other springing to life only at certain times of the year in the museum-city that is Venice.

In Istanbul, Baştarda was constructed beneath a reproduction of the wooden trusses of the hall in Sale d’Armi of Venice shipyard that hosts the Pavilion of Turkey. Measuring 30 metres long and weighing four tons, the vessel was built from more than 500 pieces including seven kilometres of steel cable and abandoned materials found on site including wooden moulds, discarded furniture, signboards and boats. In April, the components were shipped to Sale d’Armi, where Baştarda was re-constructed in May for the Pavilion of Turkey. When La Biennale closes in November 2016, Baştarda will continue her journey and she will eventually become the centrepiece of a museum of arsenal, when the site is opened to public in Istanbul.

Darzanà’s main theme raises the question of whether it is possible to transform borders, fronts and other spaces of conflict into thresholds and spaces of consensus. In this vein, Baştarda becomes a vessel of frontier infringement. She came to Venice, and she will eventually go back to Istanbul, travelling back and forth, just as the languages, the architectural forms, and people of the Mediterranean, have done throughout history. Reporting from Darzanà, one can announce the futility of demarcations on the seas and in between the words.

For more information: www.iksv.org / pavilionofturkey.iksv.org

Darzana, Pavilion of Turkey 15th Architecture Biennial in Venice 2016
Darzanà, Pavilion of Turkey, 15th Architecture Biennial in Venice 2016, Photo: Cemal Emden

Galleries from Turkey at viennacontemporary 2016

on Wednesday, 10 August 2016. Posted in ---2016---, August

Related Article: Turkey's Concept for London Design Biennial Revealed


Turkish galleries Galeri Zilberman and SANATORIUM are going to be present at this year’s edition of viennacontemporary taking place from 22-25 September. Sanatorium will bring works by Sevil Tunaboylu, Erol Eskici and Yağız Özgen, while Zilberman Gallery will participating with Alpin Arda Bağcık, Guido Casaretto, Antonio Cosentino, Ahmet Elhan, Walid Siti and Eşref Yıldırım.

Walid Siti, Deconstructed Pyramid I, 2013
Walid Siti, Deconstructed Pyramid I, 2013, straw, wood and acrylic on MDF, 59x59x37 cm. Zilberman Gallery Istanbul/Berlin

Following the success of the first edition of viennacontemporary in 2015 in the spectacular ambience of the Marx Halle, the largest art fair in the region will once again convene more than 100 Austrian, Eastern European, and international galleries in a showcase of emerging and established contemporary art. The presence of important international collectors and the continuously growing reputation of viennacontemporary have encouraged many galleries to participate in Vienna’s art fair once again in 2016. Moreover, new young and exciting galleries from Austria, the focus regions, and the Western hemisphere have also chosen to join the fair.

Eşref Yıldırım, Nezihe Muhiddin, 2014
Eşref Yıldırım, Nezihe Muhiddin, 2014, mixed media on canvas, 194x148 cm. Zilberman Gallery Istanbul/Berlin

Under the artistic direction of Christina Steinbrecher-Pfandt and executive management of Renger van den Heuvel, viennacontemporary stands for continuity and a high-caliber exhibition program. More and more art collectors and experts are making their way to Vienna, which has established itself – not least thanks to the success of viennacontemporary – as an international marketplace for contemporary art in both the domestic and international art scenes.

Following the focus countries of the past years– Georgia, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, and Belarus (2012), Georgia and Poland (2013), Azerbaijan (2014), and Bulgaria (2015), this year’s showcase explores a region in Southeastern Europe: ex-Yugoslavia and Albania. Focus: Ex-Yugoslavia and Albania is curated by the Albanian curator and writer Adela Demetja.


Walid Siti, Deconstructed Pyramid I, 2013
Yağız Özgen, Water Lilies (284 Stripes), 2016, acrylic on canvas, 180x142cm. Sanatorium Gallery Istanbul. Photo: CHROMA